strugee.net

Blog

Show only posts from 2014 2015 2016 2017

pump.io 5.1 is in beta

I'm really excited to announce that pump.io 5.1 is officially in beta!

This release makes a wide array of improvements. One of the features I'm most excited about is zero-downtime restarts, which will allow administrators to gracefully roll over to new configurations and codebases with absolutely no user-visible impact! Aside from that, here's a list of highlights:

  • The daemon now generates startup log warnings on bad configurations, including insecure secret values and internal parameters
  • An official Dockerfile is now included with the release
  • The logged-out mobile homepage's menu icon is no longer incorrectly styled as black
  • SockJS connections no longer fail due to authorization problems

As usual, this release also includes some small updates to dependencies. Plus, we started tracking how much code our test suite covers! We've also significantly cleaned up the documentation and moved almost all of the in-repository documentation to ReadTheDocs, where it's a lot more organized and accessible. If you want more than just these highlights, you can check out the changelog.

Note that while the repository includes a Dockerfile now, we have not yet begun publishing on Docker Hub due to some security logistics that need to be figured out - when we do, it'll be announced in all the usual places (including this blog).

I'm so excited for people to try out this release. 5.1 beta 0 is a drop-in replacement for 5.0, so if you're on 5.0 and want to live (more) on the bleeding edge, you can upgrade with npm install -g pump.io@5.1 if you have an npm-based install. If you have a source-based install, you should merge and/or switch to the v5.1.0-beta.0 tag. And as always, if you encounter any problems you can reach out to the community or file bugs you find.


Webmention test post

Once again I need to test whether lazymention - and more importantly, the underlying libraries (node-send-webmention and node-get-webmention-url) - complies with the W3C spec. I'll be using webmention.rocks, so, here's a large list of links:

Test 1, Test 2, Test 3, Test 4, Test 5, Test 6, Test 7, Test 8, Test 9, Test 10, Test 11, Test 12, Test 13, Test 14, Test 15, Test 16, Test 17, Test 18, Test 19, Test 20, Test 21, Test 22, Test 23

Hopefully it works \o/



filter-other-days is portable to FreeBSD

I'm pleased to announce filter-other-days 1.0.1. This is a bugfix release primarily improving portability to other Unix-like operating systems; in particular, the test suite now fully passes under FreeBSD. Specifically:

  • Various portability bugs in the test suite itself were fixed - the test suite no longer relies on a GNU date (with GNU date -d semantics) or a fully-functional /dev/fd (the fallback option is named pipes), and it doesn't hardcode bash's install path as /bin/bash
  • Some non-portable uses of echo "\n" which break under BSD systems were replaced with printf invocations
  • Travis CI now checks filter-other-days with Debian's checkbashisms script, which is run in strict mode
  • Non-portable uses of test's -o option were caught by checkbashisms and replaced with ||

With these changes I expect that filter-other-days will probably run on all major BSD distributions. I intend to confirm this hypothesis soon and have filed bugs for OpenBSD and NetBSD, plus illumos just for kicks.

As with 1.0.0, you can clone filter-other-days from GitHub or you can download a (signed) tarball. Please do report any bugs you find in the release.

Enjoy!


filter-other-days: Artificial Ignorance-compatible logfile date filtering

I've just published version 1.0 of my latest project, filter-other-days - a shell script to filter logfiles for today's date in an Artificial Ignorance-compatible way.

If you haven't heard of Artificial Ignorance, it's something you should look into cause it's pretty awesome. Here's the tl;dr: it doesn't make sense to look for all the "interesting" things in logfiles, because it's not actually possible to enumerate all the failure conditions of a system. So instead what we do is throw away entries that we're sure are just routine. Since we've gotten rid of all the uninteresting entries, whatever is left has to be interesting.

I find this pretty compelling, and decided to start implementing it on my Tor relay. I quickly realized that my ideal workflow would be to configure cron to send me email with a daily report of interesting log entries. However, this presented a problem: how to get just today's log entries? I wanted to be able to handle all logfiles at once instead of receiving different reports for different logs, so I had to be able to parse all logfiles in the same way. My relay runs on FreeBSD, so the logs are unstructured text files, and even worse, several daemons (like Tor itself) write timestamps in a different format - this makes parsing all logfiles at once super difficult because I couldn't just trivially grep for today's date since that would end up dropping legitimate entries from logfiles that formatted their timestamps differently.

I briefly considered trying to write a regex to match all sorts of different timestamp formats, but quickly rejected this idea as too fragile. There are a lot of moving parts in a modern operating system - what if e.g. a daemon changed its defaults about how to format timestamps? Or, more likely, what if I simply missed a particular format present in my logs? Then I'd be accidentally throwing away an entire logfile. To solve this problem, I decided to apply the same idea behind Artificial Ignorance - if I couldn't reliably, 100% match log entries from today's date, I could do the next best thing and attempt to discard all entries from other dates. In this case the worst that could happen is me recieving irrelevant information, and I'd be basically guaranteed to never miss an legitimate entry from today.

filter-other-days is a working implementation of this design. Originally I put it with the other random scripts I keep with my dotfiles, but it quickly became obvious that it was useful as a standalone project. So I extracted it into its own repository, which now lives on GitHub. From there I continued to improve the script while adding a test suite and writing extensive documentation (including a Unix manpage - I always feel like a wizardly hacker when writing those things). This took, by my estimation, somewhere between 10 and 15 hours because this is actually a shockingly non-trivial problem, but mostly because regexes are hard.

But today I finally finished! So I'm super excited to announce that version 1.0 of filter-other-days is now available. You can either clone it from GitHub or download a tarball (and the accompanying signature, if you want). It works pretty well already, but I have some ideas for future directions the project could go:

  1. Logic allowing you to actually specify the date you want to filter for, instead of assuming it's today (though you actually can already get this behavior using faketime; that's what the test suite does)
  2. Removal of the dependency on GNU seq - this is, to my knowledge, the only non-POSIX requirement of filter-other-days
  3. Debian package, maybe?
  4. More log formats (please report bugs if you have formats filter-other-days doesn't recognize - which you probably do!)

If you find this project useful, let me know! I'd love to hear about how people are using it. Or if it breaks (or doesn't fill your usecases), please report bugs or send patches - I love those, too! Either way, may the logs be with you!


~